Character

Leadership lessons from Mayberry

January 9, 2014

With the passing of actor Andy Griffith in 2012, his most famous TV character, Sheriff Andy Taylor of Mayberry, is worth another look for his low-key brand of leadership. Here are a few of the sheriff’s lessons on caring more and fussing less.

Bounce back from embarrassment

December 31, 2013
At some point, every leader commits a highly visible blunder. Your reputation, however, hinges on your next step. It’s best to face your employees and take responsibility.

A CEO’s keys to leading with a clear head

December 26, 2013
For Daniel Vasella, former chairman of Novartis, success comes with self-awareness. He finds that effective leaders possess four strengths.

10 steps toward self-confidence

December 20, 2013
You know this already: It takes confidence to advance from middle management to leadership. Luckily, you can learn to feel confident.

Strike a ‘power pose’ to gain an edge

December 11, 2013
Your body language can work for or against you. By striking a pose that makes you look confident, you actually gain confidence. Adopting a “power pose” may even enhance your performance.

Leadership Tips: Vol. 1113

November 26, 2013
Lead the charge when you see a challenge … Get past your limitations … Take the time to be concise.

5 characteristics of great leaders

November 11, 2013
Kevin Daum of CEO.com shares a list of essential traits.

Red Cross: ‘One woman alone’

October 31, 2013
A time machine interview with the resourceful and fearless Clara Barton, who was the first female clerk at the U.S. Patent Office. She ultimately founded the American Red Cross, serving as its first president.

What it takes to be a ‘dream leader’

October 30, 2013

Matthew Kelly, author of The Dream Manager, argues that if you take steps to help employees act on their dreams, they grow more connected, productive and loyal to you and your organization. Here’s a real-life example.

Art of leadership

September 4, 2013
Renoir’s pastel paintings of plump bourgeois people initially inspired rage, hatred and mockery. William Baker, director of a center for media education at Fordham, took away two lessons from that reaction.