Communication

Get your audience involved

November 11, 2020
Use these tactics to encourage audience involvement and hold its attention during your presentations.

Does she deserve a raise?

November 11, 2020
Q: I’ve been informed by some insiders that my administrative assistant is not happy with her salary. She has not approached me, but since I know what her tasks are and how she performs them, as well as what the going rate is for an admin in our market, she is compensated fairly. What can I tell her if she hits me up for a raise?

Don’t tolerate sloppy writing

November 11, 2020
Q. My younger employees don’t seem to care about grammar or punctuation in their correspondence. I’ve asked them to proofread their writing before sending it off, but I’m getting the impression that they don’t feel that’s important. What should I do?

Show your leadership with one question

November 11, 2020
A simple question can enhance your credibility as a leader and let employees know that you have confidence in their skills: “How can I help?”

Turn spats into constructive dialogues

November 11, 2020
Office conflicts don’t have to be destructive. For example, imagine that two employees disagree over the best way to complete a task or solve a problem, can’t resolve their quarrel, and dump it in your lap. To help these two get back to work quickly, try this approach.

3 things to share with all

November 11, 2020
Employees don’t want to be kept in the dark about what’s happening in their organization. You’ll get better performance by sharing and emphasizing this important information with them.

Negotiation blues? Take a break

November 11, 2020
Everyone gets frustrated during tense negotiations, but you can avoid an unprofessional outburst by applying this strategy.

Grab listeners’ attention with a clear purpose

November 11, 2020
Business speakers make a common mistake in their presentations: They concentrate on their agenda, instead of their purpose. Here’s the difference.

Help employees shake off errors

November 11, 2020
After an employee has made an error, co-workers may shy away. As management consultant Margaret Morford suggests, step forward and treat the employee normally.

Confront an eye-roller

October 29, 2020
You’re addressing a group, and someone is rolling his eyes or sighing at what you’re saying. Most of us try to ignore the rudeness, but sometimes you’re better off challenging it.