Celebrate the beauty of constraints

Research is showing more and more that working with limitations and constraints is a contributing factor to innovation and possibility. If you learn to embrace them, the constraints that might at first appear stifling could open up new creative opportunities.

Remember your food service industry days? You should

Back when you were scratching to make ends meet, you may have had a job as a server or in a kitchen. The culinary world has a few unique and cherished traditions that are worth carrying over into a leadership position. What might the equivalent of these traditions be where you work now?

Do your job badly, make $$$

Sometimes, a job title brings rewards no matter what. Here are five examples of business titans who failed but cashed in doing it.

6 signs you might be the reason your employees are quitting

No boss wants to admit that they are the reason for their team’s issues, but if you’re experiencing recurring morale and retention problems, you might want to look inward for the cause. According to members of Forbes Coaches Council, here are some clear signs that it’s not your employees—it’s you.

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Today's Leadership Tip

Too often when we sit down with job candidates, we set little traps for them to fall into by overanalyzing everything from their handshake to their level of eye contact to their answers to highly unusual questions—factors that can have very little to do with their ability or willingness to do the job. Your goal in interviewing should be to confirm qualifications and get to know the whole person as much as possible; snap judgments based on sneaky tests and gamesmanship won't accomplish that.

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Q. Since last fall I’ve made a few big decisions that backfired for our organization. I’m starting to doubt my ability to lead. How can I regain my edge?

Nine classic rules of war for winning big in business. Download the guide now.

Everyone seems to be seeking work/life balance. And no one seems to desire this more than leaders, managers and supervisors. I doubt there is a person who reads these words that hasn’t or doesn’t struggle with this issue. I’ve been asked about this (a lot) over the years, made some mistakes, learned some things and thought about it (a lot) too. Here is what I have learned, and what I believe to be true …

Q: “Our new Executive Director wants to change my job title from ‘communications director’ to ‘communications manager.’ I don’t believe the title of ‘manager’ accurately reflects the complexity of my work. When I meet with my boss to discuss this issue, I plan to show him my current job description and explain how my work is instrumental to achieving his vision for the company. Do you have any other suggestions?” More than a Manager