Career Management

These 6 career missteps await

June 1, 2006
Executive coach Debra Benton, author of How to Think Like a CEO, identifies these six common behaviors as career-killers.

Candor: Apply with extreme caution

December 1, 2005
If you’ve ever caught yourself saying— a bit defensively—“I was just being honest,” rest assured that you’re not the only person to have offended a colleague, customer or staff member with your candor. But effective leaders smooth out the rough edges of their candor, with these techniques.

Do you choke at the worst times?

June 1, 2005
Choking is a two-part process that can hit whenever the stakes are high: You tell yourself that something will go badly. You then under-perform to ensure that your prediction comes true. How can you stop choking?

Dressing like a manager

April 1, 2005
Even in workplaces where casual dress is the norm, managers and leaders wonder whether they should be dressing differently—that is, better—than their team members. Here are some points to consider:

Does your ‘image’ hold up in writing?

April 1, 2005
How effectively are you conveying the image that you strive to build as a leader? To find out, perform this simple test over the next workday:

Put your goals to this test

April 1, 2005
Test your career and work-related goals to see if they stand up to these four questions.

A lesson on how to leave a room

February 1, 2005
We’ll never know the whole story, but at the inauguration of John Adams as second U.S. president, George Washington once again proved himself astute in the art of leadership.

How to accomplish the ‘impossible’

December 1, 2004
What seems impossible is often no more than preconceived notions and mental models distorting what we see. Don’t believe it? Check out these examples:

Rise above soft boss

November 1, 2001
Q. My boss’ standards are way too low. She’s lax and far too accepting of average work—by myself and other managers. I find myself doing just enough to get by. Should I care?

Keep open mind when headhunter calls

September 1, 2001
You’re delighted with your current employer, so you politely brush off all inquiries from headhunters. Big mistake.