Best-Practices Leadership

Stand out from the crowd via LinkedIn

February 12, 2010

Facebook and Twitter may be getting all the attention, but you still need to pay attention to LinkedIn. LinkedIn is important precisely because it is so stodgy and predictable as a business tool. Here’s how to work it:

Why Casey Stengel didn’t rely on stars

January 11, 2010

He didn’t invent the practice of “platooning” players in baseball, but Casey Stengel honed it to the point that, under his 12-year leadership, the New York Yankees won 10 American League championships and seven World Series. Before Stengel took over the Yankees in 1949, most managers played a set lineup day in and day out.

Ask ‘who’ and ‘what’ to identify your market

January 11, 2010

Too often, customers never see products and services until they’re in stores. That’s too late. Use “who” and “what” questions to identify who your market is and what it needs.

10 warning signs of low morale

January 11, 2010

Without you realizing it, low morale can creep into your organization. Check every day to make sure people stay in tune. Here are 10 sour notes to listen for:

The 5 habits of successful CEOs

January 11, 2010

“If you think you can learn what works in the real world from anyone but someone who actually succeeded in the real world, well, let’s just say you might want to rethink your management potential,” says Steve Tobak, corporate problem-solver and “The Corner Office” blogger. Here are Tobak’s five ways to behave like a CEO:

3 secrets behind drive

January 11, 2010

Daniel Pink, author of Free Agent Nation, explores three things you can do to keep your staff motivated and productive:

How to generate game-changing ideas

January 11, 2010

Anyone can learn to innovate. That’s what researchers from Harvard Business School, Insead and Brigham Young University say, after a six-year study. They’ve identified the five secrets to being a great innovator: associating, questioning, observing, experimenting and networking.

Never fly solo; use a wingman

January 11, 2010

We all have our blind spots. For a pilot, that spot is the six o’clock position, and it’s the job of a wingman to “check six,” or keep an eye on a pilot’s vulnerable spot. Stretch the metaphor to the workplace, and it’s the leader who could use a wingman, says Air Force fighter pilot Rob “Waldo” Waldman.

Entrepreneurial leadership: Turning hair care & tequila into gold

December 11, 2009

The most important thing about John Paul DeJoria is his resemblance to the hero in a Grimm fairy tale: “The Boy Who Knew No Fear.” With a net worth today estimated at $2.5 billion, the founder of the Paul Mitchell line of hair products and Patrón ultra-premium tequila started out selling encyclopedias door-to-door …

5 ways to hack a market

November 1, 2006
Cut through the fog of innovation by following these five principles to bring new products and services to market.